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Allied Troops Prepared for Radiological Warfare on D-Day

Long before the completion of a working nuclear weapon by the United States at the end of World War Two, the United States contemplated the use of radioactive materials in warfare.From my book Nuclear Bodies:In a meeting of the Subcommittee of the S-1 Executive Committee (formerly the Uranium Committee of the US government’s Office of Scientific Research and Development) in October 1943, several of the top scientists overseeing the Manhattan Project considered methods of weaponizing radioactive

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"Nuclear Memory Effects: Remembering Hiroshima and Forgetting Fukushima," Keynote Lecture for the Troubling Anniversaries Conference

I was honored to be asked to present the keynote lecture at the Troubling Anniversaries Conference held in October 2021 jointly by the Institute for Historical Research of the School of Advanced Study at the University of London, and the Center for Public History at Queen's University Belfast. The conference brought together a fascinating cross-section of scholars and practitioners. All of the sessions are available online and can be seen here. My keynote lecture explored memory culture in

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Not Seeing the Contaminated Forest for the Decontaminated Trees in Fukushima

I have a new article up at Japan Focus. The article is part of a group of articles promoting the book, Legacies of Fukushima: 3.11 in Context, published this summer by the University of Pennsylvania Press. The article is a short presentation of the content of my chapter of the book, and the other articles in the Japan Focus collection present several chapters by other contributors. My work focuses on it has been so hard historically to see the harm done to people who's exposure to radioactivity

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How Internal Exposures to Radiation Make People Invisible: Video

I was honored to be invited to give a lecture in the "Night with the Experts" series of the Nuclear Education Information Services (NEIS) group based in Chicago (my hometown). The title of my talk is, "How Internal Exposures to Radiation Make People Invisible." There are several parts to the lecture:-The effects of nuclear weapons-How internal and external exposures to radiation are experienced differently and affect people differently-External exposures affect our whole bodies-Internal

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Nuclear Colonialism: Selecting the Irradiated, video of online lecture

On October 28, 2020, I presented an online lecture at Whitman College in their 2020 series on the academic theme of Race, Violence, and Health. The lecture was titled "Nuclear Colonialism: Selecting the Irradiated." In the talk I survey the selection of atmospheric nuclear test sites by the first five nuclear weapon states. These test sites were invariably located nearby to populations that lacked the political ability to stop the effort. Often these sites were in colonial or postcolonial

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Managing Nuclear Memory: The Journey from Hiroshima to Fukushima

Webinar!I will be in dialogue with scholars Norma Field and Yuki Miyamoto for an online discussion that you can join via Zoom next weekend, in part commemorating the nuclear attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but also exploring the public management of nuclear understandings since then, especially as relates to Fukushima, and the Global Hibakusha.Time:August 7 (Fri) 11 am (EDT) East Coast USAAugust 7 (Fri) 10 am (CDT) Central USAAugust 7 (Fri) 8 am (PDT) West Coast USAAugust 7 (Fri) 5 pm (CET)

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My interview for the Atomic Heritage Foundation

Cindy Kelly, the founder of the Atomic Heritage Foundation, visited to Hiroshima, Nagasaki and other cities in Japan earlier this year. I had the pleasure of meeting up with Cindy and having a long chat at Kissui, the kaiseki restaurant in the Sunroute Hotel in Hiroshima, overlooking the Hiroshima Memorial Peace Park. Here is the interview:The interview is up on the AHF webpage and includes a transcript. You can find it here. Here I am with Cindy across from the Peace

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Why Wildlife Returning to Chernobyl Tells Us Almost Nothing

Several years ago, I was speaking with a prominent Anthropocene scholar in Uppsala, Sweden. We were in disagreement about the risks to the environment of nuclear power. For both of us, Chernobyl was part of making our case to each other. He told me that if the radiation around Chernobyl was so dangerous, it would not now be as full of returning wildlife as it has become. Animals are becoming more abundant there, he explained, so it shows that things are not as dangerous in the Exclusion Zone as

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